Likely to be discussing William James' "The Will to Believe" on a Twitter Space on 18 October but please indicate your availability here if you are interested! xoyondo.com/dp/GWp6oGdyxwM68XF

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Montaigne views man as one animal among many.

Did Schopenhauer read Montaigne? I guess he must have? Also seems like this might be another route into Nietzsche's view of the herd, besides Darwin? Need to figure out which Darwin Nietzsche read and when

Especially since he's holding a poodle 😅 and tells the poodles to shut up:

"Faust mit dem Pudel hereintretend" and "Sey ruhig Pudel!" "Knurre nicht Pudel!"

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There's other signs ("Zeichen") in Faust, but I don't see Goethe saying "im Anfang war das Zeichen" like Hilbert does. So that must be an original formulation, but it's helpful that Per Martin-Löf points this out. Hilbert as self-conscious Faust is funny, no? 😅

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German speakers can hopefully help, what I've gathered from Goethe's Faust is that he plays with "Im Anfang war das Wort!" (from John 1:1, "In the beginning was the Word") and changes it to say "In the beginning was the Meaning" / "Power" / "Deed!"

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8. modern mathematical realists, like Hilbert: "In the beginning is the sign"

So far I'm most with Pyrrho but we're gonna have to figure out what Heraclitus is on about, because his currently seems a bit more like Philo's...

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4. Pyrrho: dogmatic account of non-evident matters, i.e., nonsense
5. Stoic logos spermatikos (generative principle of the universe)
6. Philo of Alexandria: demiurge
7. John 1:1: "In the beginning was the Word"

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This is important. It's a *Logos* question.

My draft of the progress of the Logos (skipping Heraclitus):

1. spoken explanation, reason *for*, persuasive argument
2. Sophist discourse (the fun kind)
3. Aristotelian form of persuasion alongside ethos/pathos (the not fun kind)

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Still thinking about this. Hilbert on mathematics: "In the beginning is the sign." Doesn't get much more theological than that!

Brouwer seems much more appealing in this day and age, does he not?

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RT @snipd_app@twitter.com

We've integrated @OpenAI@twitter.com's new Whisper model in Snipd 🎉 and the results are 🤯

You now get near-perfect podcast transcripts on any English podcast in the Snipd podcast app! 🚀🚀🚀

🐦🔗: twitter.com/snipd_app/status/1

If you're interested in my overview of what I'm planning to argue against, you can start here youtube.com/watch?v=2Qm01IEIYg

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I added chapters to the first video, which admittedly has quite a slow and unsteady start. I'd recommend starting here if you're interested in my philosophical journey youtube.com/watch?v=2Qm01IEIYg

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RT @cdutilhnovaes@twitter.com

This is definitely a high point in my career: giving a lecture at the Collège de France! My late father, an indefatigable francophile, would have been very proud 🤩

It's on November 14th & open to all, so maybe I'll see some Parisian friends there?
college-de-france.fr/agenda/se

🐦🔗: twitter.com/cdutilhnovaes/stat

cc @jfarmer@twitter.com @Athens_Stranger@twitter.com @CSPeirceLiker@twitter.com

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Please DM me if you'd be interested in a 1 hour 11 minute meditation/talk I gave to introduce how to practically use dependent origination to end suffering in daily life. I may later do a video on it, but if you want to hear a draft, please get in touch 🧘‍♂️🪷☸️

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McGilchrist on the styles he identifies as left hemisphere: linearity, sequential cognition, mechanical (de)construction, getting/grasping, unidirectionality, rectilinear space. Some of this relates to what I was describing above as "telos" or goal-directed activity

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I would also like to add Cleland's "Historical science, experimental science, and the scientific method" (2001) to this list csus.edu/indiv/m/merlinos/SCI/

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Here's the discussion we did of Quine, which @BryanVanNorden@twitter.com edited together with his slides on Quine! youtube.com/watch?v=laOUvYHgbv

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We're planning to discuss William James' "The Will to Believe" (1897) just like we did with Quine the other week. If this sounds interesting, could you please vote? xoyondo.com/dp/GWp6oGdyxwM68XF cc @saliemchiu@twitter.com @BryanVanNorden@twitter.com @PlayNiceInst@twitter.com @delia_burgess@twitter.com

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